jetbead USDA PLANTS Symbol: RHSC3
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Shrub or Subshrub
Rhodotypos scandens (Thunb.) Makino

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Rosales: Rosaceae
Native Range: Japan & C. China (REHD);

Jetbead is a small, multi-stemmed, up to 6 ft. (1.8 m) tall shrub that invades natural areas in the eastern United States. Leaves are opposite, simple, 2.5-4 in. (6.2-10 cm) long and doubly serrate. Leaves also have ribbed veins and a long, pointed tip. White, four-petaled, 2 in. (5.1 cm) wide flowers occur in the spring. The flowers give way to small, red (turning black), bead-like fruit. Jetbead invades forested areas creating a thick shrub layer which could displace native shrubs, shade out understory species and restrict tree seedling establishment. Jetbead is native to eastern Asia and was first introduced into the United States in 1866 as an ornamental.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Fruit(s);
John M. Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
John M. Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s);
Tracey Slotta, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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Invasive Listing Sources:
Ann F Rhoads, Morris Arboretum, Pennsylvania
City of Ann Arbor Michigan Parks and Recreation
Delaware Natural Resources and Environmental Control, 2004
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council