giant foxtail USDA PLANTS Symbol: SEFA
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Grass or Grasslike
Setaria faberi Herrm.

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Taxonomic Rank: Liliopsida: Cyperales: Poaceae
Synonym(s): Japanese bristlegrass, Chinese foxtail, Chinese millet, giant bristlegrass, nodding foxtail
Native Range: temp. Asia (GRIN);

Giant foxtail is an annual grass that can reach 2-5 ft. (0.61-1.5 m) in height. Leaves are up to 16 in. (41 cm) long, 0.6-1 in. (15-25 mm) wide with small hairs covering the top of the leaves. Flowering occurs in late summer to early fall, when a green (eventually straw colored), bristly inflorescence develops. The inflorescence resembles a foxtail, hence the common name. Giant foxtail is native to Asia and was accidentally introduced in the United States in the 1920s as a contaminant of other grain. Plants invade disturbed sites such as roadsides, landfills, fence rows and right of ways.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Foliage;
John D. Byrd, Mississippi State University, Bugwood.org
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Feature(s); Ligule
John D. Byrd, Mississippi State University, Bugwood.org
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Field;
John D. Byrd, Mississippi State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Lynn Sosnoskie, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Hitchcock, A.S. (rev. A. Chase). 1950. Manual of the grasses of the United States. USDA Misc. Publ. No. 200. Washington, DC.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); USDA NRCS. Wetland flora: Field office illustrated guide to plant species. USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Stem(s); collar and sheath.
Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org
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Stem(s);
Bruce Ackley, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org
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Spikelet(s); Spikelets in ventral view, the one on the left at an angle.
D. Walters and C. Southwick, USDA, Bugwood.org
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EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)
Stones River National Battlefield (Tennessee)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Eric Ulaszek, U.S. Forest Service, Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie, Illinois
Faith Campbell, 1998
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust, Pennsylvania.
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009