showy fly honeysuckle, Bell's honeysuckle USDA PLANTS Symbol: LOBE
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Shrub or Subshrub
Lonicera x bella Zabel [morrowii × tatarica]

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Dipsacales: Caprifoliaceae
Synonym(s): showy fly honeysuckle, whitebell honesuckle, showy bush honeysuckle
Native Range: Cultivation only - A hybrid betw. L. morrowii & L. tatarica (GRIN);

Bell’s honeysuckle is a hybrid between Lonicera morrowii and Lonicera tatarica . It is a bushy, perennial shrub that can reach up to 10 ft. (3 m) in height. Leaves are oval, opposite, entire and from 1-3 in. (2.5-7.6 cm) in length. Flowering occurs in the spring to early summer, when white or pink flowers develop in the axils of the leaves. Fruits are red berries that are eaten and spread by birds. Bell’s honeysuckle is native to Asia and occurs along forest edges, roadsides and fields.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s); Left: L. morrowii, Center: L. x bella, Right: L. tatarica
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); The flowers of the Bell's honeysuckle are generally pink in color, producing red berries. Berries may be mildly poisonous if eaten.
Joseph Berger, , Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; Lonicera xbella (very similar to Lonicera morrowii); although foliage combined with flowering structures are best to separate the introduced Lonicera spp., further hybridization among plants may make decisive identification using these morphological characters nearly impossible.
Rob Routledge, Sault College, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Bark;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); Lonicera xbella
Rob Routledge, Sault College, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Acadia National Park (Maine)
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)
Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (Indiana)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Alabama Invasive Plant Council
City of Ann Arbor Michigan Parks and Recreation
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, 1994.
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group
Faith Campbell, 1998
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Maryland Department of Natural Resources, 1994
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee. 2005. Guide to Invasive Upland Plant Species in New Hampshire. New Hampshire Department of Agriculture,  Markets and Food Plant Industry Division and New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee.
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.
Rhode Island Natural History Society,
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009