glossy privet USDA PLANTS Symbol: LILU2
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Shrub or Subshrub Hardwood Trees
Ligustrum lucidum W.T. Aiton

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Scrophulariales: Oleaceae
Synonym(s): tree privet
Native Range: China, Japan, Korea, (REHD); China, Korea (BAIL);

Glossy privet is a semi-evergreen shrub or small tree that grows up to 40 ft. (12.2 m) in height. The trunks usually occur as multiple stems with many long, leafy branches. Leaves are opposite, ovate to lanceolate, 3-6 in. (5-15.2 cm) long and 2-4 in. (5-10.2 cm) wide. Flowering occurs in late summer, when very abundant, white flowers develop at the end of branches in 5-8 in. (12.7-20 cm) long clusters. Fruits are <0.5 in. (1.3 cm) long, oval, fleshy and ripen to a dark blue to black color. Fruits persist into winter. Several privet species occur and they are often very hard to distinguish. Glossy privet resembles Japanese privet (L. japonicum Thunb.), but the leaves of Japanese privet are shorter (2 in. [5.1 cm] long) and thicker. Glossy privet commonly forms dense thickets in fields or in the understory of forests. It shades and out-competes many native species, and once established, is very difficult to remove. Glossy privet is commonly used as an ornamental shrub and for hedgerows.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Foliage; on left compared to Chinese privet on right
James H. Miller & Ted Bodner, Southern Weed Science Society, Bugwood.org
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Foliage; June
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Twig(s)/Shoot(s); October
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Bark; June
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Fruit(s); December
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s); June
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); June
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Foliage;
Karan A. Rawlins, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Foliage;
Karan A. Rawlins, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Tree(s); not blooming March, 2011 
Karan A. Rawlins, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Foliage; not blooming, March 2011
Karan A. Rawlins, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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Invasive Listing Sources:
Alabama Invasive Plant Council
Faith Campbell, 1998
Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.