perennial pepperweed USDA PLANTS Symbol: LELA2
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Forbs/Herbs
Lepidium latifolium L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Capparales: Brassicaceae
Synonym(s): Virginia pepperweed, broadleaved pepperweed, tall whitetop, broadleaved peppergrass
Native Range: Not Found (BAIL);

Perennial pepperweed is a perennial that can grow from 1-5 ft. (0.3-1.5 m) in height. In the late fall to early spring a rosette of leaves develops with 4-12 in. (10-30 cm) long and 1-2 in. (2.5-5 cm) wide, toothed leaves. Rosette leaves are long petiolate. Cauline (stem) leaves are alternate, 1-3 in. (2.5-7.6 cm) long and oblong. Flowering occurs in the late spring to summer, when flat, dense clusters of flowers develop at the apex of the flowering stem. Individual flowers are 4-petaled and white, each producing a round to oval, hairy pod that is 1/16 in. (1.5 mm) in diameter. Perennial pepperweed is native to Eurasia and occurs in coastal wetlands, riverbanks, marshes, rangelands and roadsides. It was accidentally introduced into the United States around 1936 as containment in seed.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Infestation;
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s); Roots
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seedling(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); in flower
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Basal rosettes
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Dinosaur National Monument (Colorado)
Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (Utah)
Grand Canyon National Park (Arizona)
Weir Farm National Historical Park (Connecticut)



Invasive Listing Sources:
California Invasive Plant Council
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group
Faith Campbell, 1998
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Pacific Northwest Exotic Pest Plant Council, 1998