yellow iris USDA PLANTS Symbol: IRPS
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Aquatic Forbs/Herbs
Iris pseudacorus L.

Jump to: Resources | Images | Distribution Maps | Sources
Taxonomic Rank: Liliopsida: Liliales: Iridaceae
Synonym(s): paleyellow iris
Native Range: western Asia, North Africa; western Europe, N. Africa (BAIL);

Yellow flag iris is a perennial plant that occurs in wet areas such as ditches and marshes. Leaves arise from the base of the plant and are flattened, 3-4 ft. (0.9-1.2 m) long with a raised mid-rib. Bright yellow flowers appear in late spring to early summer. Flowers develop in groups of 2-10 and have three drooping, yellow sepals with purple-brown markings and 3 smaller, unmarked and upright yellow petals. Flowers are about 3 in. (7.6 cm) wide. Fruit are brown capsules that are 2 in. (5 cm) long. Yellowflag iris was introduced into the United States in the mid-1800s as an ornamental from Eurasia or Northern Africa. Plants can withstand a wide variety of conditions, including brackish water, acidic water and periods of drought.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s); in flower
Todd Pfeiffer, Klamath County Weed Control, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Nancy Loewenstein, Auburn University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Nancy Loewenstein, Auburn University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); fruit.
Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); pale yellow form
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Nancy Loewenstein, Auburn University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); along drainage area
Nancy Loewenstein, Auburn University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); along drainage area
Nancy Loewenstein, Auburn University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Root(s); Inside of cut rhizome
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Root(s); large rhizome.
Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 1: 540.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); USDA NRCS. Wetland flora: Field office illustrated guide to plant species. USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

Alternative content

Get Adobe Flash player


U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)



Invasive Listing Sources:
California Invasive Plant Council
Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection
Delaware Natural Resources and Environmental Control, 2004
Faith Campbell, 1998
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Maryland Department of Natural Resources, 1994
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Native Plant Society of Oregon, 2008
New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee. 2005. Guide to Invasive Upland Plant Species in New Hampshire. New Hampshire Department of Agriculture,  Markets and Food Plant Industry Division and New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee.
Pacific Northwest Exotic Pest Plant Council, 1998
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009