halogeton USDA PLANTS Symbol: HAGL
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Forbs/Herbs
Halogeton glomeratus (Bieb.) C.A. Mey.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Caryophyllales: Chenopodiaceae
Synonym(s): saltlover, barilla
Native Range: Not Found (BAIL);

Halogeton is a 2-17.7 in. (5-45 cm) tall, annual herb. The stems are often curved at the base and tinged reddish or purple. Leaves are alternate, sessile, semi-succulent and 0.2-0.9 in. (4-22 mm) long. Flowers appear in June to September. Two flower types are present; larger flowers that are 0.08-0.12 in. (2-3 mm) wide with 5 light yellow or greenish-yellow sepals, and smaller flowers with tooth-like sepals. Neither of these flower types have petals, but they both have 2-5 stamens and 2 stigmas. Halogeton also produces two types of seeds. Seed produced in the early summer are light tan and wingless; seeds produced in the late summer are dark brown and winged. Tissues of this plant accumulate salts from the soil. After a plant dies, these salts leach from the plant material and are deposited onto the topsoil, this favors halogeton seed germination and establishment. Halogeton is native to Eurasia and was introduced into the United States in the early 1930s. Preferred habitat includes roadsides, dry lakebeds, shrub lands and other arid and semi-arid regions.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s);
Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Bonnie Million, National Park Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Clinton Shock, Oregon State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Clinton Shock, Oregon State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Clinton Shock, Oregon State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Clinton Shock, Oregon State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Bonnie Million, National Park Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Clinton Shock, Oregon State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Clinton Shock, Oregon State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seedling(s);
Clinton Shock, Oregon State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Badlands National Park (South Dakota)



Invasive Listing Sources:
California Invasive Plant Council
Faith Campbell, 1998
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
Pacific Northwest Exotic Pest Plant Council, 1998