cutleaf teasel USDA PLANTS Symbol: DILA4
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Forbs/Herbs
Dipsacus laciniatus L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Dipsacales: Dipsacaceae
Synonym(s): cut-leaved teasel
Native Range: Europe, w. Asia (BAIL);

Cutleaf teasel is a perennial plant that grows as a basal rosette until sending up a flowering stalk that can reach 6-7 ft. (1.8-2.1 m) in height. The small, white flowers densely cover oval flower heads and are present from July to September. Spiny bracts are located on the ends of flower stems. Opposite leaves are joined at the base and form cups that surround the prickly stem. Cutleaf teasel grows in open, sunny habitats preferring roadsides and other disturbed areas, although it can sometimes be found in high quality areas such as prairies, savannas, seeps, and sedge meadows. Cutleaf teasel was introduced from Europe in the 1700's and spreads by producing abundant seeds. It can be found in the northern states from Massachusetts to Colorado.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Flower(s); immature
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation; Along a highway rest area.
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Todd Pfeiffer, Klamath County Weed Control, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Todd Pfeiffer, Klamath County Weed Control, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Todd Pfeiffer, Klamath County Weed Control, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Todd Pfeiffer, Klamath County Weed Control, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)
Dinosaur National Monument (Colorado)



Invasive Listing Sources:
City of Ann Arbor Michigan Parks and Recreation
Faith Campbell, 1998
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Missouri Department of Conservation,
New Jersey Department of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry, 2004
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009