purple pampasgrass USDA PLANTS Symbol: COJU2
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Grass or Grasslike
Cortaderia jubata (Lem.) Stapf

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Taxonomic Rank: Liliopsida: Cyperales: Poaceae
Synonym(s): Andean pampas grass, jubatagrass, purple pampasgrass, selloa pampasgrass
Native Range: So. Amer. - Arg., Bol., Ecu. & Peru (GRIN);

Purple pampasgrass is a large, tufted, perennial grass native to South America. Leaves are basal, ascending to spreading, bright green, sharply serrated and can reach to 5 ft. (1.5 m) in height. All plants are female and develop seed through apomixis. Flowering occurs in late summer to early fall, when 1-3.3 ft. (0.3-1 m) long, purple-tinged plumes develop over the tufts of leaves. Each plume can produce up to 100,000 seeds. Purple pampasgrass invades roadsides, dunes, bluffs and other disturbed areas. Plants also invade coastal shrub and grasslands.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s);
John M. Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); close-up view of a seed plume
John M. Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Mandy Tu, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Mandy Tu, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Mandy Tu, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Mandy Tu, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); inflorescence.
Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Stem(s); collar and sheath.
Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s); Close up view of a seed plume
John M. Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Habit
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s); Plume
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; Blade
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Haleakala National Park (Hawaii)
Redwood National Park (California)



Invasive Listing Sources:
California Invasive Plant Council
Faith Campbell, 1998
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Maryland Cooperative Extension Service.  2003. Invasive Plant Control in Maryland. Home and Garden Information Center, Home and Garden Mimeo HG88. 4 pp.
National  Wildlife Refuge Association, Silent Invasion: A Call to Action from the National Wildlife Refuge Association, 2002. Washington DC. 17 pp.
Native Plant Society of Oregon, 2008