jointed goatgrass USDA PLANTS Symbol: AECY
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Grass or Grasslike
Aegilops cylindrica Host

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Taxonomic Rank: Liliopsida: Cyperales: Poaceae
Synonym(s): jointgrass
Native Range: Temp. & trop. Asia, Europe (GRIN);

Jointed goatgrass is a winter annual that can reach 4 ft. (1.2 m) in height. The leaves are alternate, up to ½ in. (1.2 cm) wide with thin hairs along the margins, sheath openings and auricles. The ligule is short and membranous. Flowering occurs in May to June, when the plants produce red (when mature) or straw-colored spikes. Spikes are cylindrical and contain 2-12 spikelets per spike. The uppermost spikelets have extremely long awns. Jointed goatgrass is native to southern Europe and western Asia. This species is known to hybridize with wheat.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s);
USDA APHIS PPQ Archive, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s); compared to wheat
USDA APHIS PPQ Archive, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s); auricles
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seedling(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s); Native to Asia, has seeds that are similar in size and shape to wheat. This make contaminated shipments of wheat very difficult to clean.
Phil Westra, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation; A native to Asia, is a serious problem in wheat producing areas of the United States. It hybridizes with wheat and outcompetes the crop for nutrients and water.
Phil Westra, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Hitchcock, A.S. (rev. A. Chase). 1950. Manual of the grasses of the United States. USDA Misc. Publ. No. 200. Washington, DC.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Grand Canyon National Park (Arizona)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Faith Campbell, 1998
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Pacific Northwest Exotic Pest Plant Council, 1998