gorse USDA PLANTS Symbol: ULEU
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Shrub or Subshrub
Ulex europaeus L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Fabales: Fabaceae (Leguminosae)
Synonym(s): furze, whin, common gorse, Irish furze
Native Range: C. & W. Europe (REHD, )

Gorse is an evergreen, perennial shrub native to Europe. Plants can grow from 3-6 ft. (1-2 m) in height. Shoots are covered with reddish-brown to grey hairs. Leaves are spine-like and 0.25-0.75 in. (0.6-1.9 cm) long. Mature shrubs have 1 in. (2.5 cm) long spines on the branches. Flowering occurs from winter to early spring, when shiny, yellow flowers develop in the axils of the leaves. Flowers are 1 in. (2.5 cm) long and fruits are hairy, 0.5-1 in. (1.3-2.5 cm) long pods. Gorse was introduced into North America in the mid-to-late 1800s as an ornamental. Plants invade gravel bars, logged areas and other disturbed areas. Plants cannot tolerate extremely dry areas or areas with extreme temperatures.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s); habit
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Eric Coombs, Oregon Department of Agriculture, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); flowers
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
George Markin, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s); stem
Norman E. Rees, USDA Agricultural Research Service - Retired, Bugwood.org
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Feature(s); thorny habit
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); flowers
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); seed pods
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s); spikes
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); habit
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); habit and flowers
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 2: 349.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Booker T Washington National Monument (Virginia)
Haleakala National Park (Hawaii)
Redwood National Park (California)



Invasive Listing Sources:
California Invasive Plant Council
Faith Campbell, 1998
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
National  Wildlife Refuge Association, Silent Invasion: A Call to Action from the National Wildlife Refuge Association, 2002. Washington DC. 17 pp.
Native Plant Society of Oregon, 2008
Pacific Northwest Exotic Pest Plant Council, 1998
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.
University of Hawaii, Botany Department, Hawaiian Alien Plant Studies, 1998