field bindweed USDA PLANTS Symbol: COAR4
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Vines Forbs/Herbs
Convolvulus arvensis L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Solanales: Convolvulaceae
Synonym(s): creeping jenny, European bindweed, morningglory, perennial morningglory, smallflowered morning glory
Native Range: Europe, Asia (BAIL);

Field bindweed is a perennial vine native to Eurasia. Leaves are round to arrow-shaped, 1-2.25 in. (2.5-5.7 cm) long and alternate. Flowering occurs in the mid-summer, when white to pale pink, funnel-shaped flowers develop. Flowers are approximately 0.75-1 in. (1.9-2.5 cm) across and are subtended by small bracts. Fruit are light brown, rounded and 1/8 in. (0.3 cm) wide. Each fruit contains 2 seeds that are eaten by birds and can remain viable in the soil for decades. Field bindweed, most likely, was introduced into North America as a contaminant in crop seed as early as 1739. Plants typically inhabit roadsides, grasslands and also along streams.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Flower(s);
Mary Ellen (Mel) Harte, , Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); in flower
Tom Heutte, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s);
Mary Ellen (Mel) Harte, , Bugwood.org
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Plant(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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Infestation;
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Infestation; 15 miles east of Melville
Norman E. Rees, USDA Agricultural Research Service - Retired, Bugwood.org
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Infestation;
Mary Ellen (Mel) Harte, , Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); In barley
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); Invasive plants and vines such as field bindweed interfere with harvesting and often clog equipment such as this combine.
John D. Byrd, Mississippi State University, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 3: 47.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 3: 47.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Badlands National Park (South Dakota)
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)
Fort Bowie National Historic Site (Arizona)
Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (Utah)
Grand Canyon National Park (Arizona)
Lake Mead National Park (Nevada)
Rocky Mountains National Park (Colorado)
Scotts Bluff National Monument (Nebraska)
Theodore Roosevelt National Park (North Dakota)
Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming)



Invasive Listing Sources:
City of Ann Arbor Michigan Parks and Recreation
Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection
Delaware Natural Resources and Environmental Control, 2004
Faith Campbell, 1998
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Missouri Department of Conservation,
Native Plant Society of Oregon, 2008
Pacific Northwest Exotic Pest Plant Council, 1998
Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust, Pennsylvania.
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009