tawny daylily USDA PLANTS Symbol: HEFU
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Forbs/Herbs
Hemerocallis fulva (L.) L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Liliopsida: Liliales: Liliaceae
Synonym(s): orange daylily, tawny daylily, common daylily
Native Range: Europe, Asia (BAIL);

Orange daylily is a popular ornamental that has escaped to invade natural and disturbed areas throughout the United States. Plants are 2-4 ft. (0.6-1.2 m) tall with round stems. Leaves are grass-like, bright-green, 1-3 ft. (0.3-1 m) long and curve toward the ground. Flowers develop in the summer and are large, showy, and orange in color. Flowers occur in clusters of 5-9 at the apex of the stalk. Flowers in a cluster open one at a time and only for one day each. Flowers may have spots or stripes. Many cultivars of daylily now exist in a wide variety of sizes and flower colors. Orange daylily infestations often occur adjacent to plantings or at old homesites. Areas invaded include meadows, forests, floodplains, ditches, and forest edges. Once established, the thick tubers make control difficult. Orange daylily is native to Asia and was introduced into the United States in the late 19th century as an ornamental.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s);
Britt Slattery, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Theodore Webster, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); base of plant.
Theodore Webster, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); base of plant
Ohio State Weed Lab Archive, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Stem(s); Stem and bract
Dan Tenaglia, Missouriplants.com, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Dan Tenaglia, Missouriplants.com, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Ricky Layson, Ricky Layson Photography, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); Stamens close-up
Dan Tenaglia, Missouriplants.com, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); fruits and seeds
Ken Chamberlain, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Antietam National Battlefield (Maryland)
Harpers Ferry National Historical Park (West Virginia)
Monocacy National Battlefield Park (Maryland)
National Capital Parks East (Washington, D.C.)
Rock Creek National Park (Washington, D.C.)



Invasive Listing Sources:
City of Ann Arbor Michigan Parks and Recreation
Delaware Natural Resources and Environmental Control, 2004
Eric Ulaszek, U.S. Forest Service, Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie, Illinois
Faith Campbell, 1998
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council
Maryland Department of Natural Resources, 1994
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust, Pennsylvania.