Chinese tallowtree USDA PLANTS Symbol: TRSE6
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Hardwood Trees
Triadica sebifera (L.) Small

Jump to: Resources | Images | Distribution Maps | Sources
Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Euphorbiales: Euphorbiaceae
Synonym(s): Chinese tallow, popcorn tree, Florida aspen, chicken tree, white wax berry
Native Range: Temp. Asia-China & Taiwan (GRIN)

Chinese tallowtree (popcorn tree) is a deciduous tree reaching 60 ft. (18.3 m) in height and 3 ft. (0.9 m) in diameter. Leaves are alternate, heart-shaped, 2-3 in. (5.1-7.6 cm) long with a long, pointed tip. Flowering occurs from April to June. The flowers are yellowish and occur on 8 in. (20 cm) long, dangling spikes. Three-lobed, greenish fruit are found in clusters at the end of branches. Fruit mature to black and then open to reveal the white wax covered seeds. Tallow tree invades wet areas such as stream banks and ditches but can also invade drier upland sites. Chinese tallowtree is a serious threat because of its ability to invade high quality, undisturbed forests. It can displace native vegetation as well as alter soil conditions due to the high amount of tannins present in the leaf litter. Chinese tallowtree is a native of China and was introduced into South Carolina in 1776 for ornamental purposes and seed oil production.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Twig(s)/Shoot(s); Tift County, GA
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Karan A. Rawlins, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Cheryl McCormick, University of Florida, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Tree(s); fall color
Ronald F. Billings, Texas Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Tree(s);
Dennis Teague, U.S. Air Force, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seedling(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Bark;
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Twig(s)/Shoot(s); September
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Mark Atwater, Weed Control Unlimited, Inc., Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Rebekah D. Wallace, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); fruit and waxy coated seeds
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s);
Joseph LaForest, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Rebekah D. Wallace, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

Alternative content

Get Adobe Flash player


U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Vicksburg National Military Park (Mississippi)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Alabama Invasive Plant Council
California Invasive Plant Council
Faith Campbell, 1998
Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Gulf of Mexico Regional Panel, Aquatic Nuisance Species Annual Report, 2001
Jackie Poole, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (personal communication)
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
National  Wildlife Refuge Association, Silent Invasion: A Call to Action from the National Wildlife Refuge Association, 2002. Washington DC. 17 pp.
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.
South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009