wine raspberry USDA PLANTS Symbol: RUPH
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Shrub or Subshrub
Rubus phoenicolasius Maxim.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Rosales: Rosaceae
Synonym(s): Japanese wineberry
Native Range: Korea, Japan, N. China (REHD);

Wine raspberry is a multi-stemmed, spiny, small shrub that invades open areas throughout the eastern United States. The canes have small spines and the entire plant is covered in minute, glandular, reddish hairs. Canes can, under favorable conditions, grow to 9 ft. (2.7 m) in length. The alternate leaves are compound with three heart-shaped, toothed leaflets. The undersides of the leaflets are silvery-white and very hairy. Small, white, 5-petaled flowers develop in the spring and give way to tasty, red, raspberry-like fruit. Wine raspberry invades moist, open areas such as fields, roadsides, forest margins, open forests and prairies. It reproduces by seed (which are readily dispersed by animals) and root nodes. New plants can grow from the canes touching the ground. It can form extensive, dense thickets that displace native vegetation and restrict light to the ground cover in open areas. Wine raspberry is native to eastern Asia and was first introduced into the United States in 1890 as breeding stock for new raspberry cultivars.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Infestation;
John M. Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; showing distinctive white underside of leaf
Jil Swearingen, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); Upper (green) and lower side (white) of leaves
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Stem(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Antietam National Battlefield (Maryland)
Blue Ridge Parkway (North Carolina)
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)
Gettysburg National Military Park (Pennsylvania)
Harpers Ferry National Historical Park (West Virginia)
Monocacy National Battlefield Park (Maryland)
National Capital Parks East (Washington, D.C.)
Petersburg National Battlefield (Virginia)
Rock Creek National Park (Washington, D.C.)
Shenandoah National Park (Virginia)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, 1994.
Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group
Faith Campbell, 1998
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Maryland Department of Natural Resources, 1994
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
New Jersey Department of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry, 2004
Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust, Pennsylvania.
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.
South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009