white poplar USDA PLANTS Symbol: POAL7
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Hardwood Trees
Populus alba L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Salicales: Salicaceae
Native Range: Africa, temp. Asia, Europe (GRIN);

White poplar is a tree that can grow 40-80 ft. (12.2-24.4m) tall and 40-50 ft. (12.2-15.2 m) wide. The bark on young trees is smooth and greenish white becoming gray and wrinkled, as trees age. The leaves resemble maple leaves, but the topside of leaves are shiny, dark green while the underside is bright white and hairy. Leaves are 2-4 in. (5.1-10.2 cm) long. Flowers are inconspicuous and develop in slim, cylindrical flower clusters (catkins) before the leaves develop. Fruit are small, hairy seed pods that are spread by wind. Branches are susceptible to breakage when under stress, such as heavy snow or ice. Trees produce prolific rootsprouts. White poplar is native to Eurasia and grows best in full sun.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Tree(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org
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Foliage;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
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Foliage;
Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org
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Foliage;
Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); 1 - 2. Branchlet with male catkins (a - c). - 2. Branchlet with female catkins (d - f). - 3. Branchlet with short shoot and ripe (a - c) fruit-catkins (fruits are capsules opening with two valves; seeds are without endosperm, furnished with tufts of cotton-like white hair). - 4. A leader with palmately lobed leaves. - 5. Winter-branchlet. - 6. Seedling with cotyledons and first ordinary leaves. After Hempel & Wilhelm, 1889. Photos and explanations from the book: Zelimir Borzan. "Tree and Shrub Names in Latin, Croatian, English, and German, with synonyms", University of Zagreb, 2001.
Zelimir Borzan, University of Zagreb, Bugwood.org
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Tree(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
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Bark;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
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Root(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 1: 587.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)
Dinosaur National Monument (Colorado)
Great Smoky Mountains National Park (North Carolina & Tennessee)
Kings Mountain National Military Park (South Carolina)
Petersburg National Battlefield (Virginia)



Invasive Listing Sources:
City of Ann Arbor Michigan Parks and Recreation
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group
Faith Campbell, 1998
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council
Maryland Department of Natural Resources, 1994
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Native Plant Society of Oregon, 2008
Pacific Northwest Exotic Pest Plant Council, 1998
Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust, Pennsylvania.
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.
South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009