Chinese silvergrass USDA PLANTS Symbol: MISI
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Grass or Grasslike
Miscanthus sinensis Anderss.

Jump to: Resources | Images | Distribution Maps | Sources
Taxonomic Rank: Liliopsida: Cyperales: Poaceae
Synonym(s): Chinese silvergrass, eulalia, Chinese plume grass, zebra grass, eulaliagrass
Native Range: Temp. & trop. Asia (GRIN);

Chinese silvergrass is a tall, up to 12 ft. (3.7 m), densely-bunched grass that invades roadsides, forest edges, old fields, and other disturbed areas throughout the United States. The leaves are long (up to 18 in. [45 cm]), slender, and upright-to-arching with sharp tips and rough margins. The midribs are silvery in color. The terminal panicle is fan-shaped, long (2 ft. [0.6 m] in length), and silvery to pink in color. Flowering occurs in late summer. Chinese silvergrass escapes from ornamental plantings and can form large clumps along disturbed areas, displacing native vegetation. The grass is also extremely flammable and increases fire risks of invaded areas. Chinese silvergrass is native to Asia and was introduced into the United States for ornamental purposes during the late 1800s.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Flower(s); October
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation; in November
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s); closeup throat in September
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Britt Slattery, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation; Infestation along trail
Britt Slattery, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation; October
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Arthur E. Miller, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Root(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Control; Weedeating miscanthus before it goes to seed
Great Smoky Mountains National Park Resource Management Archive, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Hitchcock, A.S. (rev. A. Chase). 1950. Manual of the grasses of the United States. USDA Misc. Publ. No. 200. Washington, DC.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 1: 113.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

Alternative content

Get Adobe Flash player


U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Blue Ridge Parkway (North Carolina)
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)
Great Smoky Mountains National Park (North Carolina & Tennessee)
Rock Creek National Park (Washington, D.C.)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Alabama Invasive Plant Council
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, 1994.
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group
Faith Campbell, 1998
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Indiana Native Plant and Wildflower Society
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
Jil Swearingen, personal communication, 2009-2013
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council
Maryland Cooperative Extension Service.  2003. Invasive Plant Control in Maryland. Home and Garden Information Center, Home and Garden Mimeo HG88. 4 pp.
Maryland Department of Natural Resources, 1994
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
New Jersey Department of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry, 2004
Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust, Pennsylvania.
South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009