Amur honeysuckle USDA PLANTS Symbol: LOMA6
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Shrub or Subshrub
Lonicera maackii (Rupr.) Herder

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Dipsacales: Caprifoliaceae
Synonym(s): Amur bush honeysuckle
Native Range: Manchuria, Korea (REHD); Asia (BAIL);

Amur honeysuckle is a multi-stemmed, upright, deciduous shrub that grows to 15 ft. (4.8 m) tall. The leaves are opposite, ovate, 2-3 in. (5.1-7.6 cm) long, 0.5-1.5 in. (1.3-3.8 cm) wide, accuminate and usually persist into winter. Often it is one of the first shrubs to leaf out in the spring. The fragrant flowers are tubular, white to yellow in color, thin-petaled and develop in May to June. In September abundant, fleshy berries ripen to red in color and often persist into the winter. Berries are 1/4 in. (0.6 cm) in diameter. Several species of exotic bush honeysuckles occur and distinguishing species can be difficult. Amur honeysuckle readily invades open woodlands, old fields and other disturbed sites. It can spread rapidly due to birds and mammals dispersing the seeds and can form a dense understory thicket which can restrict native plant growth and tree seedling establishment. Amur honeysuckle is a native of eastern Asia and was first introduced into North America in 1855. It has been planted widely as an ornamental and for wildlife food and cover.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Planted along fence
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Brought to south Georgia from Missouri
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); Fruit in September
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; December
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); Flowers
John M. Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Annemarie Smith, ODNR Division of Forestry, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seedling(s);
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Bark; in December
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Bark;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park (Maryland, Washington, D.C., and West Virginia)
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)
George Washington Memorial Parkway (Virginia)
Great Smoky Mountains National Park (North Carolina & Tennessee)
Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (Indiana)
National Capital Parks East (Washington, D.C.)
Stones River National Battlefield (Tennessee)



Invasive Listing Sources:
City of Ann Arbor Michigan Parks and Recreation
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, 1994.
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group
Delaware Natural Resources and Environmental Control, 2004
Faith Campbell, 1998
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Indiana Native Plant and Wildflower Society
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
Jil Swearingen, personal communication, 2009-2013
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council
Maryland Cooperative Extension Service.  2003. Invasive Plant Control in Maryland. Home and Garden Information Center, Home and Garden Mimeo HG88. 4 pp.
Maryland Department of Natural Resources, 1994
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Missouri Department of Conservation,
New Jersey Department of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry, 2004
Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust, Pennsylvania.
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.
Tatyana Livschultz, Pennsylvania survey of invasive plants,
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009