Brazilian waterweed USDA PLANTS Symbol: EGDE
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Aquatic
Egeria densa Planch.

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Taxonomic Rank: Liliopsida: Hydrocharitales: Hydrocharitaceae
Synonym(s): Brazilian waterweed, Brazilian elodea, South American waterweed
Native Range: S. America (BAIL);

Brazilian egeria is a submersed aquatic plant that invades freshwater systems throughout much of the United States. The finely serrated leaves are usually less than 1 in. (2.5 cm) long and occur in whorls of 3-6. The flowers, which bloom above the surface of the water, are white with three petals. Often confused with hydrilla, Brazilian egeria has a smooth midrib on the underside of the leaf, whereas hydrilla has small teeth. Brazilian egeria invades both still and flowing water ecosystems including lakes, ponds, ditches, and rivers. It can form dense stands that crowd out native vegetation and reduce the area's value as fish habitat. It can also interfere with recreational activities such as fishing and swimming. Brazilian egeria was first introduced into the United States in the late 1800s as an aquarium plant.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Foliage;
Virginia Tech Weed Identification Guide Archive, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; Leaf whorl
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation; combination of Egeria densa and Egeria najas; predominantly Egeria densa
William T. Haller, University of Florida, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Structure; leaf
Robert Vidéki, Doronicum Kft., Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Graves Lovell, Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s);
Ann Murray, University of Florida, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)



Invasive Listing Sources:
California Invasive Plant Council
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group
Delaware Natural Resources and Environmental Control, 2004
Faith Campbell, 1998
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Native Plant Society of Oregon, 2008
New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee. 2005. Guide to Invasive Upland Plant Species in New Hampshire. New Hampshire Department of Agriculture,  Markets and Food Plant Industry Division and New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee.
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009