porcelain-berry USDA PLANTS Symbol: AMBR7
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Vines
Ampelopsis brevipedunculata (Maxim.) Trautv.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Rhamnales: Vitaceae
Synonym(s): creeper, porcelainberry, wild grape, porcelain berry
Native Range: Northeast Asia (REHD, BAIL); Temp. Asia (GRIN);

Amur peppervine is a deciduous, woody vine that climbs to heights of more than 20 ft. (6.1 m). It has become a serious invader of the eastern United States and closely resembles native species of grape. These branched tendril-bearing, woody vines (native grapes have unbranched tendrils) have lenticels and white piths that are continuous across the nodes. The alternate leaves are simple and heart-shaped with coarse teeth along the margins. The leaves vary from slightly lobed to deeply dissected. Flowering occurs in mid-summer, when greenish to white, inconspicuous flowers develop in small clusters. Fruits are small berries that range from yellow to purple to blue in color. Amur peppervine prefers moist, rich soils and can thrive in a wide range of light availability. It invades streambanks, pond margins, forest edges and other disturbed areas. The thick mats formed by this climbing vine can cover and shade out native shrubs and young trees. It spreads very quickly since birds and mammals eat and thus disperse the seeds. Amur peppervine is native to Japan and northern China. It was first introduced into the United States in 1870 as an ornamental and landscaping plant.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s); fruiting
Jil Swearingen, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Bark;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seedling(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Nancy Loewenstein, Auburn University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s); Tendrils In November
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Stem(s);
Karan A. Rawlins, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Karan A. Rawlins, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park (Maryland, Washington, D.C., and West Virginia)
George Washington Memorial Parkway (Virginia)
Minute Man National Historical Park (Massachusetts)
National Capital Parks East (Washington, D.C.)
Rock Creek National Park (Washington, D.C.)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Alabama Invasive Plant Council
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, 1994.
Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group
Delaware Natural Resources and Environmental Control, 2004
Faith Campbell, 1998
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Invasive Plant Council of New York State
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Maryland Cooperative Extension Service.  2003. Invasive Plant Control in Maryland. Home and Garden Information Center, Home and Garden Mimeo HG88. 4 pp.
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
New Jersey Department of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry, 2004
Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust, Pennsylvania.
Rhode Island Natural History Society,
Tatyana Livschultz, Pennsylvania survey of invasive plants,
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009