sawtooth oak USDA PLANTS Symbol: QUAC80
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Hardwood Trees
Quercus acutissima Carruthers

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Fagales: Fagaceae
Native Range: Japan, Korea, China, Himalaya (REHD);

Sawtooth oak is a large, up to 50 ft. (15.2 m) in height, deciduous tree that has recently started invading forests in the eastern United States. The leaves are alternate, broadly lance-shaped, 4-7.5 in. (10.2-19 cm) long, up to 2.5 in. (6.4 cm) wide with bristly teeth along the margin. Flowers bloom in May and are small and inconspicuous. Fruit are large acorns with spreading, curved scales on the involucre. Trees produce large amounts of acorns. Sawtooth oak has been found in recent years to escape plantings and establish in nearby forests, potentially displacing native vegetation. Sawtooth oak is native to Asia and has been widely planted in the United States as an ornamental and as food for wildlife.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Fruit(s); Acorns in September
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Karan A. Rawlins, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Karan A. Rawlins, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); Developing acorn in September
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Tree(s);
USDA NRCS Archive, USDA NRCS, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Bark; Bark and foliage
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
The Dow Gardens Archive, Dow Gardens, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; Foliage
David Stephens, , Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
David Stephens, , Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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Invasive Listing Sources:
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Jil Swearingen, personal communication, 2009-2013
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Maryland Cooperative Extension Service.  2003. Invasive Plant Control in Maryland. Home and Garden Information Center, Home and Garden Mimeo HG88. 4 pp.
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.
South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009