burmareed

Cyperales > Poaceae > Neyraudia reynaudiana (Kunth) Keng ex A.S. Hitchc.
Synonym(s): silkreed

Burmareed is a perennial, bunch grass that can grow to 10 ft. (3 m) tall. Leaves are linear, flat, slightly hairy on the top, glabrous (no hairs) underneath, 8-39 in. (20-100 cm) long and 0.3-1 in. (8-25 mm) wide. Leaf sheaths are marked by a collar of hairs and a hairy ligule. Flowering occurs in April to October, when large, silver, plume-like inflorescences develop. The inflorescences can be up to 3 ft. (0.9 m) long. Burmareed can be distinguished from common reed by the hairy collar around the leaf sheath. Burmareed is native to South Asia and was introduced into the United States in 1916. Burmareed is extremely flammable and can produce flames up to 30 ft. (9 m) high.


Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources


Selected Images from Invasive.org

Click on each thumbnail to download the image at 1536x1024 resolution or below for available resolutions.
Use 768x512 for Microsoft PowerPoint and use 1536x1024 for Prints and Publications.

Flower(s); inflorescence
Dan Clark, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Plant(s);
Dan Clark, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Plant(s);
Dan Clark, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Plant(s);
Tony Pernas, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org
768x512

Invasive Reference(s):

Check Invasive.org for most current lists.
  • Florida - EPPC list


External Links


footer line
USDA Forest Service Bugwood University of Georgia