Japanese wisteria

Fabales > Fabaceae > Wisteria floribunda (Willd.) DC.

Japanese wisteria is a deciduous, woody vine capable of growing to a height of 35 ft. (10.7 m). Stems can be up to 10 in. (25.4 cm) in diameter, with smooth, tight gray to white bark. Alternate, pinnately compound leaves (13-19 leaflets) are tapered at the tip with wavy edges. Leaflets are up to 12 in. (30 cm) in length. Lavender, pink or white flowers are fragrant, very showy and abundant and occur in dangling clusters in the spring. Flowers clusters are 9-20 in. (22.9-50.8 cm) long. Seeds are contained within brown, hairy, flattened, bean-like pods. Although seeds are viable, vegetative growth is the primary method of spread for this invasive. Invasions often occur around previous plantings. Japanese wisteria can displace native vegetation and kill trees and shrubs by girdling them. The vine has the ability to change the structure of a forest by killing trees and altering the light availability to the forest floor. A native of Japan, it was first introduced into North America around 1830 for ornamental purposes.


Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

  • Weeds of the Week - USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Area, Forest Health Protection

Selected Images from Invasive.org

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Plant(s);
J. Scott Peterson, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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Damage; Large vines (one with English ivy growing on it) girdling pines. Greenville, SC
Randy Cyr, GREENTREE Technologies, Bugwood.org
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Infestation;
John D. Byrd, Mississippi State University, Bugwood.org
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Infestation;
John D. Byrd, Mississippi State University, Bugwood.org
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Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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Invasive Reference(s):

Check Invasive.org for most current lists.
  • Georgia - EPPC list
  • South Carolina - EPPC List
  • Tennessee - EPPC List
  • Texas - Invasive Plant List
  • Virginia - Invasive Alien Plant Species
  • Mid-Atlantic - EPPC List


External Links


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USDA Forest Service Bugwood University of Georgia