golden bamboo

Cyperales > Poaceae > Phyllostachys aurea Carr. ex A.& C. Rivière

Golden bamboo is a perennial, reed-like plant that can reach heights of 16 to 40 ft. (5-12 m). The canes (stems) are hollow with solid joints and can be 1 to 6 in. (2.5-15.2 cm) in diameter. Leaves are alternate, 3-10 in. (7.6-25.4 cm) long and 0.25-0.75 in. (0.6-1.9 cm) wide. Flowering is very rare (maybe once every 7 to 12 years). Plants spread by rhizomes. Infestations are commonly found around old homesites and can rapidly expand in size. Golden bamboo can form dense, monocultural thickets that displace native species. Once golden bamboo is established, it is difficult to remove. Golden bamboo is native to China and was first introduced into the United States in 1882 for ornamental purposes.


Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

  • Weeds of the Week - USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Area, Forest Health Protection

Selected Images from Invasive.org

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Plant(s); New sprout in September
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Stem(s); July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Stem(s); planted but usually soon regretted, would be one of our worst weeds, except it seldom, if ever produces seeds
James R. Allison, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Bugwood.org
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Foliage; July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Foliage; in July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); in July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); in July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Infestation; Planted but usually soon regretted. Wide-creeping rootstocks form impenetrable, solid stands. "Roots-of-steel" can buckle sidewalks and driveways. Lee Co., GA
James R. Allison, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Bugwood.org
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Feature(s); Close-up of stem
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); Stems
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Infestation;
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Infestation; Infestation along right-of-way
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Infestation;
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Infestation;
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Infestation;
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Infestation;
Nancy Fraley, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org
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Infestation;
Nancy Fraley, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org
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Fruit(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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Invasive Reference(s):

Check Invasive.org for most current lists.
  • Alabama - IPC List
  • Florida - EPPC list
  • Georgia - EPPC list
  • South Carolina - EPPC List
  • Texas - Invasive Plant List
  • Virginia - Invasive Alien Plant Species
  • Mid-Atlantic - EPPC List
  • Invasive Plants: Guide to Identification and the Impacts and Control of Common North American Species


External Links


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USDA Forest Service Bugwood University of Georgia