chinaberry

Sapindales > Meliaceae > Melia azedarach L.
Synonym(s): Chinaberrytree, Persian lilac

Chinaberry is a deciduous tree growing to 50 ft. (15.2 m) in height and 2 ft. (0.6 m) in diameter. The leaves are alternate, bi-pinnately compound, 1 to 2 ft. (0.3-0.6 m) in length and turn golden-yellow in fall. Flowering occurs in the spring, when showy, lavender, 5-petaled flowers develop in panicles. Fruit are hard, yellow, marble-sized, stalked berries that can be dangerous on sidewalks and other walkways. Seeds are spread by birds. Chinaberry invades disturbed areas and is commonly found along roads and forest edges. It has the potential to grow in dense thickets, restricting the growth of native vegetation. Chinaberry is native to Southeast Asia and northern Australia. It was introduced into the United States in the mid 1800s for ornamental purposes.


Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

  • Weeds of the Week - USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Area, Forest Health Protection

Selected Images from Invasive.org

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Seedling(s);
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Feature(s); rootsprouts in July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Tree(s);
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Foliage; July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s); Flowers with mature fruit from previous season in May
Ted Bodner, Southern Weed Science Society, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Chris Evans, River to River CWMA, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Feature(s);
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Feature(s);
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Bark; July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); in winter
Ronald F. Billings, Texas Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Fruit(s);
Ronald F. Billings, Texas Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Fruit(s);
Ronald F. Billings, Texas Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Tree(s);
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Tree(s); November
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Infestation;
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Infestation; along road
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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Invasive Reference(s):

Check Invasive.org for most current lists.
  • Alabama - IPC List
  • Florida - EPPC list
  • Georgia - EPPC list
  • South Carolina - EPPC List
  • Tennessee - EPPC List
  • Texas - Invasive Plant List
  • Virginia - Invasive Alien Plant Species
  • Mid-Atlantic - EPPC List
  • Invasive Plants: Guide to Identification and the Impacts and Control of Common North American Species


External Links


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USDA Forest Service Bugwood University of Georgia