mimosa

Fabales > Fabaceae > Albizia julibrissin Durazz.
Synonym(s): mimosa tree, powderpuff tree, silk tree, silktree

Mimosa is a small tree that is 10 to 50 ft. (3-15.2 m) in height, often having multiple trunks. It has delicate-looking, bi-pinnately compound leaves that resemble ferns. Flowering occurs in early summer, when very showy, fragrant, pink flowers develop in groups at the ends of the branches. Fruit are flat, 6 in. (15.2 cm) long seed pods that develop in the late summer. Mimosa invades any type of disturbed habitat. It is commonly found in old fields, stream banks, and roadsides. Once established, mimosa is difficult to remove due to the long lived seeds and its ability to re-sprout vigorously. Mimosa is native to Asia and was first introduced into the U.S. in 1745. It has been widely used as an ornamental.


Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

  • Weeds of the Week - USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Area, Forest Health Protection

Selected Images from Invasive.org

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Diagram or Graphic; Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 2: 331.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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Fruit(s);
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s); in June
Ted Bodner, Southern Weed Science Society, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
John D. Byrd, Mississippi State University, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Tree(s); June
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Infestation; Along a walking path. Sevier County, TN.
Chris Evans, River to River CWMA, Bugwood.org
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Foliage; July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Twig(s)/Shoot(s); June
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Twig(s)/Shoot(s); in February
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Bark; in November
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Invasive Reference(s):

Check Invasive.org for most current lists.
  • Alabama - IPC List
  • Florida - EPPC list
  • Georgia - EPPC list
  • Kentucky - EPPC List
  • South Carolina - EPPC List
  • Tennessee - EPPC List
  • Tennessee - Noxious Weed Law
  • Texas - Invasive Plant List
  • Virginia - Invasive Alien Plant Species
  • Mid-Atlantic - EPPC List
  • Invasive Plants: Guide to Identification and the Impacts and Control of Common North American Species
  • Invasive Plants of the Upper Midwest
  • Invasive Plant Atlas of the Mid-South


External Links


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USDA Forest Service Bugwood University of Georgia