Callery pear (Bradford pear)

Rosales > Rosaceae > Pyrus calleryana Dcne.

Callery pear, or Bradford pear, is an ornamental, deciduous tree that can grow up to 40 ft. (12.2 m) in height. Some non-sterile cultivars of this species have escaped and are invading natural areas throughout the eastern United States. The leaves are alternate, simple, 2 to 3 in. (5.1-7.6 cm) long, petiolate and shiny with wavy, slightly-toothed margins. The overall shape of the tree is often described as a tear-drop that often spreads out with age. Flowering occurs early in the spring (April to May) before the leaves emerge. The flowers are 1 in. (2.5 cm) wide, showy, malodorous and white. Fruits are round, 0.5 in. (1.3 cm) in diameter and green to brown in color. The "Bradford" variety of pear, which produced sterile fruits, has been widely planted throughout the United States since the early 1900s, but recent cultivars, bred to reduce the tendency of the tree to split in snow or high winds, have produced viable seeds and escaped to invade disturbed areas.


Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

  • Weeds of the Week - USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Area, Forest Health Protection

Selected Images from Invasive.org

Click on each thumbnail to download the image at 1536x1024 resolution or below for available resolutions.
Use 768x512 for Microsoft PowerPoint and use 1536x1024 for Prints and Publications.

Foliage;
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Bark;
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Flower(s);
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Twig(s)/Shoot(s); twigs and thorns
Nancy Loewenstein, Auburn University, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Tree(s); November
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Fruit(s);
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Failure; Showing split tree, to correct this new hybrids were developed, these were not sterile.
Rich Mason, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Fruit(s);
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Fruit(s); November
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Twig(s)/Shoot(s); November
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Flower(s);
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Tree(s); Tree in flower
Dan Tenaglia, Missouriplants.com, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Tree(s); in flower
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Tree(s); in flower
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Tree(s);
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Tree(s);
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Seedling(s);
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Infestation;
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Tree(s); in flower
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Tree(s); Trees in flower
Britt Slattery, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Flower(s); flower petals on ground
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Feature(s); tree splitting
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
768x512 / 1536x1024

Invasive Reference(s):

Check Invasive.org for most current lists.
  • Alabama - IPC List
  • Georgia - EPPC list
  • South Carolina - EPPC List
  • Mid-Atlantic - EPPC List
  • Invasive Plants: Guide to Identification and the Impacts and Control of Common North American Species
  • Invasive Plants of the Upper Midwest


External Links


footer line
USDA Forest Service Bugwood University of Georgia