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multiflora rose biological control


19 Images
0002152
Rae Chambers
Pennsylvania State University

wood block

0002051
James W. Amrine Jr.
West Virginia University

Irregular reddening of leaf caused by rose rosette disease

0002052
James W. Amrine Jr.
West Virginia University

bright red shoots emerging in the spring

0002053
James W. Amrine Jr.
West Virginia University

Witches' broom of rose rosette disease (yellow stems), heavily affected by powdery mildew

0002054
James W. Amrine Jr.
West Virginia University

symptomatic inflorescence (red pannicle, accompanied by normal flowers on healthy foliage (a separate plant)

0002055
James W. Amrine Jr.
West Virginia University

diseased stem on left with an enlarged thorny stem; normal stem and flower on right

0002056
Anatomy Department Archive
West Virginia University

ventral surface near head end as seen by the Scanning Electron Microscope; the mite is about 50 microns wide at the genital coverflap

0002057
Anatomy Department Archive
West Virginia University

dorsal shield of female showing the distinctive pattern that identifies this mite as seen by the Scanning Electron Microscope

0002058
James W. Amrine Jr.
West Virginia University

dorsal shield of female as seen in the light microscope, using phase contrast microscopy

0002059
James W. Amrine Jr.
West Virginia University

three females in a dissecting tray; the left female is about 2 mm long

0002060
James W. Amrine Jr.
West Virginia University

hypanthia or hips

0002061
James W. Amrine Jr.
West Virginia University

A dissected hip: the soft fruit shell is on the right (typical of mid-November), five normal-sized seed are at the upper left, and three "dwarf" seed, representing unpollinated ovules at the lower left; note the abundant, sharply tapered fibers that are always present in the hip; they irritate the digestive tract of song birds, causing the seed to move quickly through the gut (in just a few hours).

0002062
James W. Amrine Jr.
West Virginia University

ovipositing female, inserting her ovipositor near the edge of the dried inflorescence

0002063
James W. Amrine Jr.
West Virginia University

dissected seeds showing larvae and a pupa that were inside (May)

0002064
James W. Amrine Jr.
West Virginia University

a mating pair on a leaflet (May); the male is the smaller, upper beetle

0002065
James W. Amrine Jr.
West Virginia University

girdled cane caused by larva (August); the oviposition site is at the right edge of the girdle; the cane will probably die distal to the girdle

0002066
James W. Amrine Jr.
West Virginia University

a "flag" caused by the break of a cane at the girdle (August)

0002067
James W. Amrine Jr.
West Virginia University

close up of girdle and broken cane

0580052
James W. Amrine Jr.
West Virginia University

map of known distribution in the USA