Browse By

General Info

Xylosandrus muttilatus


7 Images
1274029
Doug Stone
Mississippi State University

Mature adult female is a robust glossy black beetle, notice that it is larger than most ambrosia beetles. It measures 3.7 millimeters in length

1274030
Doug Stone
Mississippi State University

Just under the scutellum in a female, you will find the mycangia. The mycangia Is a highly specialized saclike organ of ectodermal origin, which is used by the beetle to maintain and transport fungi during dispersal. Notice the honeycomb appearance of the mycangia.

1274031
Doug Stone
Mississippi State University

A close look into the ultrastructure of the mycangia yields many fungal spores and segmented hyphae. From (Kajimura and Hijii 1994) and (Kinuura 1995), the primary food source for the larvae and adults is a species-specific fungus in the genus Ambrosiella.

1274032
Doug Stone
Mississippi State University

The mature adult male is dwarfed and flightless. The sex ratios in ambrosia beetles can be (10:1) to (30:1) female to male. The males are rarely seen. After mating with the mother beetle or late emerging sisters, the male dies.

1274033
Doug Stone
Mississippi State University

The eggs are ellipsoidal in shape and are white, shiny, and soft. Notice the thickness of the fungi lining the gallery wall.

1274034
Doug Stone
Mississippi State University

Feeding on Ambrosiella spp.

1274035
Doug Stone
Mississippi State University

Here is a typical gallery in wild muscadine vine. Notice the black stain from the fungi remains in the wood after beetle emergence.