Browse By

General Info

SFIWC 2004


73 Images
1274001
Alex Mangini
USDA Forest Service

Curled up under the bright lights (head at right-center). Defensive urticating spines are visible - including the thin brown "hypodermic needles" with the irritating defense chemical. 2X magnification

1274002
Alex Mangini
USDA Forest Service

Urticating spines on the dorsal surface of the larva. The thin brown "hypodermic needles" have been broken off when the larva was positioned under the scope. 3X magnification.

1274003
Alex Mangini
USDA Forest Service

Right lateral side showing a spiracle. The characteristic red and white lateral lines are also visible. 3X magnification.

1274004
Alex Mangini
USDA Forest Service

Close up the a spiracle. The fine structure of the spiracle opening is visible. Also, the translucent, patterned nature of the exoskeleton is visible. 10X magnification.

1274005
Alex Mangini
USDA Forest Service

Collected from Ips gallery. They are predaceous on nematodes. The elongated, bulbous structures are the chelicerae. 40X Image using bright-field illumination and a planar 4X lens.

1274006
Alex Mangini
USDA Forest Service

Cheliceral claws of the mite. The claws, used to grab and hold prey, are at the tips of the chelicerae. 600X image obtained using bright-field illumination and a 60X fluroscopic lens.

1274007
Alex Mangini
USDA Forest Service

Setae on the dorsum of the mite. The presence of abundant setae is called hypertrichy and is a diagnostic character. 400X image obtained using bright-field illumination and a 40X planar lens.

1274008
Alex Mangini
USDA Forest Service

Female collected from litter under a juniper in Harding County, NM. Stereoscopic image using reflected light. Detail of body is obscured

1274009
Alex Mangini
USDA Forest Service

Image using transmitted light. Brown bulb-like structure is the genital plate; under it is the triangular anal plate.

1274010
Alex Mangini
USDA Forest Service

Image using both reflected and transmitted light (compare to images 1274009 and 1274008). The combined illumination enhances the details and reveals the three-dimensional structure of the body.

1274011
Alex Mangini
USDA Forest Service

Leg II, image focused on the tarsus (distal segment). The claw and tarsal setae are visible. The number and arrangement of the tarsal setae are taxonomically important for mesostigmatid mites.

1274012
Alex Mangini
USDA Forest Service

the tubular process at right is the ovipositor. 400X image using dark-field illumination and a 40X phase-contrast lens.

1274013
William M. Ciesla
Forest Health Management International

Avery Island, LA

1274014
William M. Ciesla
Forest Health Management International

Mature larva. Near Bucharest, Romania

1274016
William M. Ciesla
Forest Health Management International

This insect is a common defoliator of frangipani and also reportedly occurs in the extreme southern United States (southern LA, TX, AZ and FL.). Plymouth, Tobago (Trinidad and Tobago).

2nd place in the 2004 Southern Forest Insect Work Conference Photo Salon in the category of Forest Insects.

1274017
William M. Ciesla
Forest Health Management International

Feeding on milkweed flower. Fort Collins, CO.

1274018
William M. Ciesla
Forest Health Management International

Heavy mortality. Mesa Verde N.P., CO.

3rd place in the Southern Forest Insect Work Conference Photo Slaon in the category of Forest Insect Damage.

1274019
Bob Rabaglia
Maryland Department of Agriculture

Emergence sequence. Maryland, 2004. See pictures 1274019-1274026 for complete sequence.

1274020
Bob Rabaglia
Maryland Department of Agriculture

Emergence sequence. Maryland, 2004. See pictures 1274019-1274026 for complete sequence.

1274021
Bob Rabaglia
Maryland Department of Agriculture

Emergence sequence. Maryland, 2004. See pictures 1274019-1274026 for complete sequence.

1274022
Bob Rabaglia
Maryland Department of Agriculture

Emergence sequence. Maryland, 2004. See pictures 1274019-1274026 for complete sequence.

1274023
Bob Rabaglia
Maryland Department of Agriculture

Emergence sequence.  2004. See pictures 1274019-1274026 for complete sequence.

1274024
Bob Rabaglia
Maryland Department of Agriculture

Emergence sequence. Maryland, 2004. See pictures 1274019-1274026 for complete sequence.

1274025
Bob Rabaglia
Maryland Department of Agriculture

Emergence sequence. Maryland, 2004. See pictures 1274019-1274026 for complete sequence.

1274026
Bob Rabaglia
Maryland Department of Agriculture

Emergence sequence. Maryland, 2004. See pictures 1274019-1274026 for complete sequence.

1274027
Bob Rabaglia
Maryland Department of Agriculture

Adults swarming

1274028
Chris Steiner
USDA Forest Service

Mating

1274029
Doug Stone
Mississippi State University

Mature adult female is a robust glossy black beetle, notice that it is larger than most ambrosia beetles. It measures 3.7 millimeters in length

1274030
Doug Stone
Mississippi State University

Just under the scutellum in a female, you will find the mycangia. The mycangia Is a highly specialized saclike organ of ectodermal origin, which is used by the beetle to maintain and transport fungi during dispersal. Notice the honeycomb appearance of the mycangia.

1274031
Doug Stone
Mississippi State University

A close look into the ultrastructure of the mycangia yields many fungal spores and segmented hyphae. From (Kajimura and Hijii 1994) and (Kinuura 1995), the primary food source for the larvae and adults is a species-specific fungus in the genus Ambrosiella.

1274032
Doug Stone
Mississippi State University

The mature adult male is dwarfed and flightless. The sex ratios in ambrosia beetles can be (10:1) to (30:1) female to male. The males are rarely seen. After mating with the mother beetle or late emerging sisters, the male dies.

1274033
Doug Stone
Mississippi State University

The eggs are ellipsoidal in shape and are white, shiny, and soft. Notice the thickness of the fungi lining the gallery wall.

1274034
Doug Stone
Mississippi State University

Feeding on Ambrosiella spp.

1274035
Doug Stone
Mississippi State University

Here is a typical gallery in wild muscadine vine. Notice the black stain from the fungi remains in the wood after beetle emergence.

1274036
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

1st place in the 2004 Southern Forest Insect Work Conference Photo Salon in the category of Forest Insect Damage.

1274037
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

May be abundant on the trunk of a tree. Here a "herd" of barklice inhabits the bark of a mimosa tree. Because they are gregarious, they are sometimes called "tree cattle."

1274038
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

Bess beetles are common in decaying logs. They are a beneficial insect in that they aid in recycling dead wood.

1st place in the 2004 Southern Forest Insect Work Conference Photo Salon in the category of Forest Insects.

1274039
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

Bess beetles are common in decaying logs. They are a beneficial insect in that they aid in recycling dead wood.

1274040
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

Pitch tube

1274042
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

Lacewing eggs sit atop thread-like stalks, which help prevent newly hatched larvae from eating each other. Adults and larvae are predators.

1274043
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

May emerge in May and September. Sometimes, a mass emergence occurs and the insects become a nuisance to motorists by clogging radiators, damaging paint, and hindering vision.

1274044
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

1274045
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

Chrysalis

1274047
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

Constructs a vase-like nest made from clay, usually attached to a leaf or a twig. The nest is provisioned with insect larvae.

1274048
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

Hides on the bark of a live oak tree. On the bark of certain trees, this moth is very well camouflaged.

1274050
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

Larvae that fall to the ground become a meal for fire ants

1274051
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

Feeding under the bark of a loblolly pine tree killed by pine engraver beetles

1274052
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

1274055
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

Forms an interesting leaf arrangement. Select any pair of leaves and notice that they are the shape of a butterfly. The underside of the leaves is a deep purple which bleeds through to the top.

1274056
Laura Lazarus
North Carolina Division of Forest Resources

Mating

1274057
Laura Lazarus
North Carolina Division of Forest Resources

Female on Norway spruce log

1274058
Laura Lazarus
North Carolina Division of Forest Resources

Moor County, NC

1274059
Laura Lazarus
North Carolina Division of Forest Resources

1274060
Laura Lazarus
North Carolina Division of Forest Resources

Emerging from log

1274061
Laura Lazarus
North Carolina Division of Forest Resources

Tiger Valley, NC

1274062
Laura Lazarus
North Carolina Division of Forest Resources

Yancey County, NC

1274063
Ronald F. Billings
Texas Forest Service

1274064
Ronald F. Billings
Texas Forest Service

East Texas

1274065
Tom Coleman
USDA Forest Service

3rd place in the 2004 Southern Forest Insect Work Conference Photo Salon in the category of Forest Insects.

1274066
Tom Coleman
USDA Forest Service

1st place in the 2004 Southern Forest Insect Work Conference Photo Slaon in the category of Other.

1274067
Tom Coleman
USDA Forest Service

Emerging

1274068
Tom Coleman
USDA Forest Service

Mating

1274069
Tom Coleman
USDA Forest Service

Adult with some sort of pathogen or fungus

1274070
Tom Coleman
USDA Forest Service

On greenbriar

1274071
Tom Coleman
USDA Forest Service

1274072
Tom Coleman
USDA Forest Service

1274073
Tom Coleman
USDA Forest Service

1274074
Tom Coleman
USDA Forest Service

1274075
Doug Stone
Mississippi State University

1274076
Laura Lazarus
North Carolina Division of Forest Resources

1274077
Timothy Haley
USDA Forest Service

this is probably the largest insect in North America. B.W.’s are very common throughout the New World tropics and fly year round in the Rio Grande Valley and south Florida. They migrate north from Mexico through Texas primarily in June.

1274078
Timothy Haley
USDA Forest Service

this is probably the largest insect in North America. B.W.’s are very common throughout the New World tropics and fly year round in the Rio Grande Valley and south Florida. They migrate north from Mexico through Texas primarily in June.

1274079
Timothy Haley
USDA Forest Service

this is probably the largest insect in North America. B.W.’s are very common throughout the New World tropics and fly year round in the Rio Grande Valley and south Florida. They migrate north from Mexico through Texas primarily in June.