Browse By

General Info

Giant Bark Aphid by Joe Pase, Texas Forest Service - SFIWC 2002 Photo Salon Series - First Place


5 Images
1150117
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

The giant bark aphid is the largest aphid in North America. During December 2001 and through most of March 2002, an outbreak of this aphid was found covering about the eastern quarter of Texas. They mainly attacked oak trees, especially live oak and water oak. Natural enemies, such as lady beetles, played an important role in controlling aphid populations. During winter months when temperatures are cold, predator and parasite insects are not very active, and this may be the reason aphid populations became so large early in 2002.

1150115
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

The giant bark aphid is the largest aphid in North America. During December 2001 and through most of March 2002, an outbreak of this aphid was found covering about the eastern quarter of Texas. They mainly attacked oak trees, especially live oak and water oak. Natural enemies, such as lady beetles, played an important role in controlling aphid populations. During winter months when temperatures are cold, predator and parasite insects are not very active, and this may be the reason aphid populations became so large early in 2002.

1150120
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

The giant bark aphid is the largest aphid in North America. During December 2001 and through most of March 2002, an outbreak of this aphid was found covering about the eastern quarter of Texas. They mainly attacked oak trees, especially live oak and water oak. Natural enemies, such as lady beetles, played an important role in controlling aphid populations. During winter months when temperatures are cold, predator and parasite insects are not very active, and this may be the reason aphid populations became so large early in 2002.

1150143
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

Natural enemies, such as lady beetles, played an important role in controlling aphid populations. During winter months when temperatures are cold, predator and parasite insects are not very active, and this may be the reason aphid populations became so large early in 2002.

1150142
Herbert A. 'Joe' Pase III
None

As aphids feed, they excrete a sticky, clear liquid known as honeydew that often forms a sticky coating on automobiles, picnic tables, lawn furniture, and plants underneath plants where aphids are feeding. A gray-black, sooty mold soon begins to grow on the sugar-rich honeydew, and it not only blocks sunlight and disrupts photosynthesis, but it can damage the finish on cars, chairs, tables or other objects.