Browse By

General Info

alligatorweed biological control


10 Images
4723001
Gary Buckingham
USDA Agricultural Research Service

mats grow from shore and often cover entire waterways thereby disrupting water flow and causing flooding.

4723002
USDA Agricultural Research Service Archive
USDA Agricultural Research Service

has opposite, non-succulent leaves

4723003
Gary Buckingham
USDA Agricultural Research Service

the white flowers are arranged in stalked, short, headlike spikes, and have a style

4723004
Gary Buckingham
USDA Agricultural Research Service

adults and larvae devour leaves and upper portions of stems

4723005
USDA Agricultural Research Service Archive
USDA Agricultural Research Service

are bright orange, 1970's

4723006
Gary Buckingham
USDA Agricultural Research Service

leaf distortion and stunting of the plants is characteristic of feeding by adults and larvae

4723007
Willey Durden
USDA Agricultural Research Service

inconspicuous light tan moths that rest with wings held closely to the body

4723008
USDA Agricultural Research Service Archive
USDA Agricultural Research Service

stems damaged internally by larvae, wilt, turn yellow, and die, 1970's

4723009
USDA Agricultural Research Service Archive
USDA Agricultural Research Service

mats are often completely defoliated by the beetle. Wiley Durden collected beetles by "walking on water" during the initial establishment phase of the program

4723010
USDA Agricultural Research Service Archive
USDA Agricultural Research Service

mats turn yellow but still retain leaves in contrast to the yellow stems defoliated by the alligatorweed flea beetle