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Global Invasive Species Team listserve digest #153

Fri Mar 07 2008 - 13:00:39 PST

Contents
1. Marine invasives study (Global, Planet Earth)
2. WIMS 3 Released!! (Global, Planet Earth)
3. Eastern N. America Invasives Learning Network Workshop (Eastern & Midwest States, USA)
4. Phragmites australis on a large river system and periodic flooding as control? (Nebraska, USA)
5. Lepidium latifolium response to fire (California, USA)
6. Midwestern kudzu seed sought (Midwestern states, USA)
7. Management and control info for rubber tree? (South Pacific, Planet Earth)
8. Management of Phalaris aquatica (Victoria, Australia)
9. Controlling Artemisia vulgaris (Connecticut, USA)
10. More on Oxalis pes-caprae (California, USA)
 
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1. Marine invasives study (Global, Planet Earth)
From: Jennifer Molnar (jmolnar(at)nature.org)
 
A new Nature Conservancy study is the first global review of marine invasive
species. Led by scientists in The Nature Conservancy's Center for Global
Trends and published recently in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment,
it documents 329 marine invasive species - where they are, how they got
there, and which ones are most harmful. The results of the study show that
the threat of marine invasive species is widespread - 84% of the world's
marine ecoregions have been invaded by at least one species.
 
Preventing introductions is key in addressing the threat of invasive
species, as once a non-native species is introduced and becomes invasive in
a marine habitat, it is almost impossible to remove it. The study
identified top global pathways responsible for invasions: shipping
(including via ballast water and bio-fouling) was the most common pathway of
species in our study (69%), followed by aquaculture (41%).
 
More information about the study is available at
www.nature.org/marineinvasions..
 
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2. WIMS 3 Released!! (Global, Planet Earth)
From: Mandy Tu (imtu(at)tnc.org)
 
TNC's Weed Information Management System (WIMS) is a Microsoft Access-based
relational database application designed to assist natural resource managers
in managing their weed-related information. An updated version of WIMS is
now available, with compatibility to both ArcPad 6 and 7, and several new
features to aid in the collection and maintenance of weed mapping and
management data. New and updated training documents are also available!
See: http://tncinvasives.ucdavis.edu/wims.html
 
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3. Eastern N. America Invasives Learning Network Workshop (Eastern & Midwest
States, USA)
From: Mandy Tu (imtu(at)tnc.org)
 
Save the Date! "Workshop on Invasive Species Prevention and Management:
Spotlight on Salty Species" will be October 7-9th, 2008 in Silver Beach,
Eastern Shore of Virginia.
 
This learning network is focused on building strategic learning and
implementation for abating invasive species threats at multiple scales
through a peer-learning network of practitioners and partners. While the
strategies and approaches we will discuss and use should be applicable to
all sites and habitat types, this 2008 workshop will highlight coastal and
estuarine habitats. New participants and TNC project sites are welcome!
 
Cost: The workshop is free to all participants. Some meals will also be
provided. Participants have to pay their own travel, lodging, and some meal
costs.
Registration, travel and other meeting information will be available by July
2008.
 
For more information: http://tncinvasives.ucdavis.edu/networks.html
 
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4. Phragmites australis on a large river system and periodic flooding as control? (Nebraska, USA)
From: Chris Helzer (chelzer(at)tnc.org)
 
Is anyone working to control Phrag in a large river system? We have it on
the Platte and Republican (Nebraska) rivers and want to eliminate it from
portions of these large river systems. Also, has anyone tried river flow
management to control it? Are periodic high flows beneficial to the control
of Phrag?
 
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5. Lepidium latifolium response to fire (California, USA)
From: Mike Kelly (mkelly1(at)san.rr.com)
 
Does anyone have experience, successful or failures, with treating Lepidium
latifolium at basal stage post fire? In San Diego 95% of our Lepidium burned
in a single fire in one almost contiguous location. The already dead above
ground biomass was burned off as was all the native tree and shrubs it was
embedded in. The lepidium was one of the first plants to resprout after the
fire and it has resprouted vigorously, as was to be expected. We have a
burst of growth, which shouldn't go beyond a basal stage until spring.
 
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6. Midwestern kudzu seed sought (Midwestern states, USA)
From: Lewis Ziska (lewis.ziska(at)ars.usda.gov)
 
Do you have access to kudzu seed from Midwestern populations? I am testing
kudzu seed for thermal tolerance to germination. Since 1971 there has been a
clear northward migration in the Midwest (from western PA to SE Missouri) of
kudzu, combined with a decrease in minimal winter temperatures. This might
connect the dots between global warming and kudzu spread.
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7. Management and control info for rubber tree? (South Pacific, Planet Earth)
From: Pat Bily (pbily(at)tnc.org)
 
Does anyone have any information or experience managing two species of
rubber trees (Castilla elastica and Funtumia elastica)? We are looking for
any information on their invasive characteristics and control methods,
especially as it pertains to the South Pacific.
 
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8. Management of Phalaris aquatica (Victoria, Australia)
From: Barry Rice (bamrice(at)ucdavis.edu)
 
I was recently contacted by Bob Parsons (r.parsons(at)latrobe.edu.au) who
is looking for updated information on the control, general ecology, and mode
of invasion of Phalaris aquatica. Apparently it is quite a bad problem in
eastern Australia. Please contact Bob with your information, and cc me with
your response.
 
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9. Controlling Artemisia vulgaris (Connecticut, USA)
From: Daniel Schiefferle (dschiefferle(at)optonline.net)
 
Last summer I worked with a group of master gardener volunteers who were
removing invasive plant species at a local wildlife sanctuary. One of the
species was mugwort or Artemisia vulgaris. The technique which we employed
was cutting the plant at ground level repeatedly throughout the growing
season. We plan to continue the effort this spring.
I would appreciate information regarding control of Artemisia vulgaris by
non-chemical methods.
 
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10. More on Oxalis pes-caprae (California, USA)
From: Bob Berlage (bberlage(at)big-creek.com)
 
A colleague asked me to forward this information...
 
I've been controlling two acres of of O. pes-caprae with 1,1,1 triclopyr for
about three years. It is vastly preferable to glyphosate because it is
selective, thus one can retain a grass groundcover on steep ground. The
location is the Santa Cruz Mountains. The original infestation was so thick
it suppressed even Italian thistle and ripgut brome.
 
Where we are, the real key is being ready on those rare warm days in mid
winter (Dec-Jan) when the temperature pushes above 60F. Managing the sun
aspect is important. I try to hit the area just before the temperatures
cross the threshold. It is worth the several applications necessary this
time of year to get the plant before it forms new bulblets and after it has
depleted the stored energy in the bulblets from the prior year. Further, the
plants in dense infestations tend to shield each other, so you get each one
more completely when they're small. As you kill them, more bulblets push up
and you get more of the "bulblet bank" earlier in the process. I saw very
few flowers that first year or since.




Updated April 2008
©The Nature Conservancy, 2006