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Global Invasive Species Team listserve digest #108
Thu Sep 19 2002 - 16:50:36 PDT

--CONTENTS--
1. RFP's for NE and Caribbean invasives assessments (Florida, USA)
2. Rubus phoenicolasius (North Carolina, USA)
3. Dioscorea, Oxalis, and Weed-Busters (Nationwide, USA)
4. Monitoring class (Alaska, USA)
5. Restoring heavily invaded mine lands (Arkansas, USA)
6. Various meetings (Global)

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1. RFP's for NE and Caribbean invasives assessments (Florida, USA)
From: Chris Bergh (cbergh(at)tnc.org)

The Nature Conservancy is searching for independent contractors to conduct
assessments of the invasive species of the Caribbean and the northeastern
US. The goal of these assessments is to better inform planning and
conservation actions in both of these areas. Requests for proposals,
outlining the Conservancy's intentions and expectations with these
projects, are posted on the WIST web page:
(http://tncinvasives.ucdavis.edu/newsnotes.html)

There is some flexibility with the structure and it may be possible for
individual contractors to conduct specific subsets of the research defined
in each RFP. The due date is 25 September 2002, but if you are unable to
meet this date, contact me.

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2. Rubus phoenicolasius (North Carolina, USA)
From: Beth Bockoven (bbockoven(at)tnc.org)

Does anyone have information on the control of wineberry (Rubus
phoenicolasius)?

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3. Dioscorea, Oxalis, and Weed-Busters (Nationwide, USA)
From: Barry Rice (bamrice(at)ucdavis.edu)

WIST has recently added many interesting new features on the web site.
These include:

**A new species management abstract (Species Management Summary) on Dioscorea oppositifolia. Yet
another species of Dioscorea (this time, Chinese yam!) is invading
areas in the midwest and eastern USA. Read more at:
http://tncinvasives.ucdavis.edu/esadocs/diosoppo.html

**Oxalis pes-caprae is a new invader in northern California dune fields.
This alert describes the invader in greater depth. Read about it at:
http://tncinvasives.ucdavis.edu/alert/alrtoxal.html

**Are you interested in developing your own cadre of volunteers to act as
your early weed detection and rapid response teams? Learn how TNC's
Maryland/D.C. Chapter produced their Weed-Watchers and Weed-Busters
programs.
Read more at: http://tncinvasives.ucdavis.edu/outreach.html#wwwb

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4. Monitoring class (Alaska, USA)
From: Barry Rice (bamrice(at)ucdavis.edu)

What is the point of vegetation management if you are not monitoring your
results? If your monitoring skills are rusty (or broken!), consider taking
the popular and most excellent Vegetation Monitoring workshop. This spring
it will be held in Fairbanks (Alaska) 15-21 May. If you are at all
interested in attending, look at the course agendum and description files
on our web site at: http://tncinvasives.ucdavis.edu/meetings.html

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5. Restoring heavily invaded mine lands (Arkansas, USA)
From: Meryl Hattenbach (mhattenbach(at)tnc.org)

We're working to restore native species to reclaimed mine lands in central
Arkansas. The abandoned mines have been filled with stockpiled (and
combined) soil and subsoil, graded to a 3:1 slope or less, limed (using a
variety of materials) to a depth of 15 inches, and then revegetated with a
mix of a half dozen or so pasture species that are mostly non-native and
undesirable. These species include fescue (Festuca), Bermuda grass
(Cynodon dactylon), Johnson grass (Sorghum halepense), a variety of
clovers such as Lespedeza cuneata, L. stipulacea, Melilotus alba, and
probably Trifolium spp.

I'm trying to come up with several promising strategies to try out next
year to remove these pasture species and establish native ones. Do you
know of anywhere I can find information for this type of work without
researching eradication techniques for each species separately?

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6. Various meetings (Global)
From: Barry Rice (bamrice(at)ucdavis.edu)

Information about a number of invasive species meetings have been added to
the Wildland Invasive Species Team web site. The next is coming up in
less than a week:

***Livestock Grazing for Vegetation Management
   24-25 September; Sparks, Nevada

To learn more about these meetings, go to our web site meeting page at:
http://tncinvasives.ucdavis.edu/meetings.html




Updated September 2002
©The Nature Conservancy, 2002