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Global Invasive Species Team listserve digest #105
Wed Jun 05 2002 - 10:13:03 PDT

--CONTENTS--
1. Economic impacts of terrestrial aquatics (Wisconsin, USA)
2. Russian Olive Control (Colorado, USA)
3. Imperata cylindrica (California, USA)
4. Conservation easements and invaders (Nationwide, USA)

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1. Economic impacts of terrestrial aquatics (Wisconsin, USA)
From: Susan Lehnhardt (susan(at)appliedeco.com)

Regarding the query on economic impacts of invasive aquatics in Listserve
Digest #104---Has anyone completed or proposed to conduct a similar study
for economic impacts of terrestrial species?

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2. Russian Olive Control (Colorado, USA)
From: Brian Mihlbachler (brian.mihlbachler(at)usafa.af.mil)

I am planning on controlling large Russian olive trees (Eleaegnus
angustifolia) by cutting the stump, then immediately treating the cambium
with 5-10 cc of straight Roundup. The questions has been asked, could the
tree stumps be cut 2-3 feet high, left for a few days, then recut at
ground level just before applying the herbicide? I am wondering if this
might decrease the effectiveness of the chemical?

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3. Imperata cylindrica (California, USA)
From: Barry Rice (bamrice(at)ucdavis.edu)

Imperata cylindrica 'Red Baron' is a frequently sold, supposedly
non-invasive cultivar of cogongrass. I have heard from at least one person
that this plant can produce seed, and the seedlings can have the usual,
agressive characters that make the "wild form" of the species such a
problem. Has anyone else seen this behavior in Imperata cylindrica 'Red
Baron'?

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4. Conservation easements and invaders (Nationwide, USA)
From: John Randall (jarandall(at)ucdavis.edu)

At the request of TNC employee Roberta Vallone I am looking for examples
of conservation easements that restrict the use of certain invasive plants
and/or require that certain species be controlled. If you know of any
please send me a copy or let me know who I should contact to learn more.

We may post a summary of good examples on our website, of course following
consultation with legal folks to make sure that we do not include any
information that is confidential or sensitive for the landowners or
easement holders involved.




Updated June 2002
©The Nature Conservancy, 2002